27 August 2015

Treasure Chest Thursday: "Saul" Myers family advertisement, FLPBA 1949 anniversary publication

GREETINGS
- - - from - - -

Mr. & Mrs. Saul Myers
AND FAMILY
and 
CAROL and DAVID

120 OCEAN PARKWAY
BROOKLYN, N.Y.

The spelling of Sol's first name in this advertisement is likely a typo as he is consistently referred to as Solomon or Sol in all other records (census, his parents naturalization, his father's probate, and his social security file).

Sol Myers was the middle child and only son of Samuel and Esther Myers. I previously wrote about Sam here and here and Esther, here. Both of Sol's parents were born in the Russian Empire and were active in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association (FLPBA). 

Sol was born in New York City on 27 December 1920 and grew up in Brooklyn and the Bronx.[1] He was in the Army during World War II, serving from 23 November 1942 to 21 October 1945.[2] He became an accountant (CPA) and taught at the college level.[3] He and his wife Beatrice had five children (clearly only two were born when this FLPBA anniversary publication was printed).

Sol died on 7 August 1986. He and Beatrice are not buried in any of the three FLPBA plots in Montefiore or Beth David Cemeteries in New York.

Notes:
1. 1925 New York State census, Kings County, New York, enumeration of inhabitants, Brooklyn, election district 54, assembly district 18, page 52, Samuel and Esther Meyers family; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 7 June 2012); New York State Archives, Albany.
1930 U.S. census, Bronx County, population schedule, Bronx, enumeration district 3-428, sheet 24A, dwelling 484, family 484, Samuel and Esther Meyers family; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : 26 December 2008); NARA microfilm publication T626 , roll 1477.
2. "U.S., Department of Veterans Affairs BIRLS Death File, 1850-2010," index, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 August 2015), entry for Sol Myers; "Beneficiary Identification Records Locator Subsystem (BIRLS) Death File," U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, D.C.
3. "Deaths," Sol Myers, New York Times (New York), 8 August 1986; digital image, New York Times (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/nytarchive.html : accessed 27 August 2011).

25 August 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: Abraham and Chasi Charny, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY


CHARNY

Here lies
Our beloved mother Mrs.
Chasya Feiga
daughter of Tzvi 
Died 9 Shevat 5704
May her soul be bound in everlasting life
Beloved mother
CHASI
Died Feb 3, 1944
Age 76 Years 
----------
Here lies
Our beloved father Mr.
Avraham Dov son of
Asher Yosef haCohen 
Died 9 Tammuz 5705
May his soul be bound in everlasting life 
Beloved father
ABRAHAM
Died June 20, 1944
Age 85 years
----------
BELOVED PARENTS
 
Abraham and Chasya Charny were born in Lubin (aka Labun, Russian Empire), married there and had their children: Nathan (Noach), Louis (Leib), Anna (Henia) Rubin (Ravrebe) and Duona (or Dvora) Goldfarb.

Abraham, a glazier, left for the United States in the summer of 1907. He landed in Quebec on 20 July 1907 destined for Chicago.[1] 

It wasn't until well after World War I that his family joined him in the Chicago. Chasya arrived in 1924 heading for Chicago. Chasya reported that her relative left in the old country was her daughter Duona (likely, Dvora) Goldfarb.[2]

By the 1930 U.S. census enumeration, Abraham, Chasya, their sons and daughter Anna and their families were all in Brooklyn. Abraham and Chasya lived at 910 Myrtle Avenue with Anna and her husband Harry Rubin and in 1940 at 930 Myrtle Avenue.[3]

The Hebrew year of death appears to be incorrect on Abraham's gravestone. The year translates as 5705, but clearly should be 5704 - the same year as Chasya. 

In addition, there is some question about Abraham and Chasya's parents' names. Chasya's death certificate indicates that her father was Abraham Gold and her mother Sarah Fried.[4] Her tombstone indicates her father's name was Tzvi. It should be noted that both Nathan and Louis had sons they named Harry. Tzvi Hirsch is a common name combination (since the names Tzvi and Hirsch have the same meaning in both Hebrew and Yiddish). So, perhaps, Tzvi was, indeed, her father's name. We do not have any current information to allow us to resolve this discrepancy, however.

Abraham's parents are listed on his death certificate as Joseph Charny and Dora Gold.[5] His father's name on htis document would be consistent with his tombstone, but the surname of the mother, Gold, is the same as that offered for Chasya's father on her death certificate. 

It is certainly possible that the surnames for Chasya's father and Abraham's mother were the same and it is also possible that Abraham and Chasya were cousins (1st cousin marriage, for example, was not rare among Jewish populations). However, it is also possible that the common surname is a mistake by one of the informants. Harry Charny, Chasya's grandson (likely Nathan's son) was the informant on her death certificate. Nathan was the informant for his father's death certificate.

Abraham and Chasya are buried in adjoining graves in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot in Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York: block 89, gate 156N, line 5K, graves 6 and 5.

Notes:
1. "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 December 2010), manifest, S.S. Kensington, Liverpool to Quebec, arriving 20 July 1907, p. 5, Abraham Charny; citing NARA microfilm publication T715.
2. "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 March 2011), manifest, S.S. Belgenland, Cherbourg to New York, arriving 5 May 1924, p. 3, Chasia Tshorny; citing NARA microfilm publication T715.
3. 1930 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-323, sheet 21A, dwelling 100, family 288, Abraham and Esther Charny; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 11 December 2010); NARA microfilm publication T 626, roll 1503.
1940 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-723, sheet 7A, household 159, Abraham and Sasha Charny; digital image, FamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org : accessed 24 August 2015); NARA microfilm publication T 627, roll 2565.
4. Kings County, New York, death certificate no. 3005 (1944), Chassa Charney, 3 February 1944; Municipal Archives, New York City.
5. Kings County, New York, death certificate no. 12712 (1944), Abraham Charney, 20 June 1944; Municipal Archives, New York City.

20 August 2015

Treasure Chest Thursday: Louis Chorny family advertisement, FLPBA 1949 anniversary publication

Continuing the review of the pages included in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association 1949 anniversary publication, we note the advertisement from Louis and Gertrude Chorny.

Louis Chorny, another glazier from Labun, was the son of Abraham and Chasi (aka Esther) Chorny/Charny/Czarny. Louis was born in that community on about 28 October 1901.[1] He arrived in the United States as Leib Czarny at the age of 18 on 9 August 1921.[2]

Abraham emigrated in 1907 and settled initially in Chicago. The rest of the family did not travel to the USA until the early 1920s. They joined Abraham who had become a locksmith.

Before 1930 Louis, his brother Nathan, and his father and mother moved to New York City.[3] Abraham continued his locksmithing, and Louis and Nathan were glaziers.

On 27 March 1927, Louis married Gertrude Rubin, a New York City native.[4] Louis and Nathan's sister, Henie or Anna, also married someone named Rubin. She married her husband Harry Ravrebe in Labun. He changed his surname to Rubin in the United States. I do not have enough information about Gertrude to determine if she might have been related to Harry.

I have been able to locate only the 1940 census numeration for Louis and Gertrude.[5] By then, they were living at 287 Wyckoff Avenue, Brooklyn, with their two children: Lucille (age 11) and Harold (3).

Notes:
1.  "U.S. Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014," index, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 August 2015); entry for Louis Chorny, July 1971. 
2. "New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 December 2010), manifest, S.S. Kroonland, Antwerp to New York, arriving 9 August 1921, p. 23, Leib Czarny; citing NARA microfilm publication T715, roll 3005.
3. 1930 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-323, sheet 21A, dwelling 100, Abraham and Esther Charny; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 11 December 2010); NARA microfilm publication T627. 
1930 U.S. Census, Kings Co., NY, pop. sched., Brooklyn, E.D. 24-2404, sheet 6B, household 146, Nathan and Yetta Charny family.
4. Unfortunately, I have not yet acquired their marriage certificate (1927, Kings no. 4204) from the New York City Municipal Archives. Interestingly, I have located this record indexed on the Italian Genealogy Group website (where Louis' surname was indexed as Chomy), but have not been able to locate it in the index on FamilySearch.
5. 1940 U.S. Census, Kings County, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, enumeration district 24-2404, sheet 6B, household 146, Louis and Gertrude Chorny family; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 August 2015); NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2609.

18 August 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: Fanny Schechter, Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, NY

Here lies
Feiga daughter of Mordechai
Died 21 Elul 5706
May her soul be bound in everlasting life
----------
FANNY
SCHECHTER
DIED SEPT. 17, 1946
AGE 94 YEARS
----------
OUR BELOVED
MOTHER

Fannie Schechter, lived with her son Max Schechter, his wife Rose, and their son Abraham in Queens New York after immigrating to the United States from Labun, Soviet Union in about 1922. She is recorded with her son's family at 10908 Kimball Avenue in Richmond Hill, Queens, New York in the 1925 New York State Census and at 10908 103rd Avenue in Queens in the 1930 and 1940 U.S. Census records.[1]  

The fact that the house numbers are the same on differently named streets in Queens indicates that either this is an amusing coincidence or that the 1925 census enumeration may have been in error. However, I have not found other records for this family that will allow evaluation of the 1925 census record.

Fanny's death certificate indicates that she was the widow of Shimon and the daughter of Motche and Chashe Mailman.[2] Chashe's maiden name was unknown to her grandson Abraham, who was the informant on her death certificate.

Fanny/Faige was buried on 18 September 1946 in the First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association plot at Montefiore Cemetery, Queens, New York (Block 89, Gate 156W, Line 7L, Grave 2).

Notes:
1. Queens County, New York, 1925 New York State census enumeration, Richmond Hill, assembly district 5, election district 49, sheet 6, entry 38, Fanny Shechter; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 June 2015); New York State Archives, Albany.
Queens County, New York, 1930 U.S. census, population schedule, Richmond Hill, enumeration district 41-519, sheet 12A, dwelling 187, family 243, Fannie Schechter; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 9 June 2015); NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 1068.
Queens County, New York, 1940 U.S. census, population schedule, Ozone Park, enumeration district 41-16971, sheet 1B, household 252, Fannie Scheter; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 April 2015); NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 2751.
2. Kings County, New York, death certificate no. 18142 (1946), Faige Schechter, 17 September 1946; Municipal Archives, New York City.

13 August 2015

Treasure Chest Thursday: Harry Kargman family advertisement, FLPBA 1949 anniversary publication

Aron (later Harry) Kargman was both born in 1884 in Labun. Sarah was born in 1892 in Polonnoye, a town about ten miles to the northeast. Harry and Sarah were married in this area of the  Russian Empire before Harry became an immigrant 1912.[1] He joined his brother Louis in New York City. 

According to census records, Sarah followed several years later in about 1920.[2] Their only child Edward was born on 25 March 1930.[3]

Harry's manifest identified him as a tailor. But later, like his brother, he became a glazier. His 1942 World War II draft registration shows that his glass business was called Pacific Glass Company, Inc., located at 1833 Fulton Street, Brooklyn.[4]

Edward enlisted in the National Guard in Brooklyn on 21 June 1948 and served through February 1951.[5] He later owned a check cashing business in Brooklyn. 

Harry passed away on 22 April 1953 and Sarah died in 1967.[6] I do not know where they were buried. Their graves are not in the any of the three First Lubiner Progressive Benevolent Association burial plots.

There are a couple of newspaper articles over the years when robberies were attempted at the Edward's store. Ultimately, Edward was shot in the stomach during a robbery attempt in June 1970.[7] He died of his wounds nine days later at the age of 40.

Notes:
1. "New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 August 2015), manifest, S.S. Nieuw Amsterdam, Rotterdam to New York, arriving 23 September 1912, list 7, line 22, Aron Kargman, citing NARA Microfilm Serial T715.
2. 1925 New York State Census, Kings County, enumeration of inhabitants, Brooklyn, assembly district 5, election district 37, page 25, Harry and Sarah Kargman; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 August 2015); New York State Archives, Albany.
3. "U.S. Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014," index, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 August 2015); entry for Edward Kargman, June 1970.  
4. "U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 August 2015), card for Harry Kargman, no. U 1871, New York City Draft Board; NARA record group 147.
5. "New York, New York National Gurad Service Cards, 1917-1954," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 August 2015); entry for Edward Kargman; New York State Archives, Albany, Series B2001, film 45.
6. "U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007," index, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 August 2015), entries for Harry Kargman (death 22 April 1953) and Sarah Kargman (death 24 September 1967).
7. "2 Gunmen Stage $200,000 Robbery; 2 Hurt in Brooklyn Holdup of Armored Car," New York Times (New York), 2 June 1970.